From the Sea to the Classroom in the Mountains

From the Sea to the Classroom in the Mountains
Posted on 02/21/2022
Third-graders at Black Mountain Primary are not afraid to get their hands dirty when it comes to learning. Students in Ms. Cynthia Leatherwood’s class learned about squids as part of their Wit and Wisdom lessons. Ms. Leatherwood decided to take what the students learned in literature, and relate it to science with a dissection.By: Breanna Hensley
BCS Communications Dept.

Third-graders at Black Mountain Primary are not afraid to get their hands dirty when it comes to learning. Students in Ms. Cynthia Leatherwood’s class learned about squids as part of their Wit and Wisdom lessons. Ms. Leatherwood decided to take what the students learned in literature, and relate it to science with a dissection.

“We read ‘Giant Squid’ so I wanted to give them the opportunity to touch and see something that they read about,” explained Ms. Leatherwood. “Being in the mountains of North Carolina, most of us have never seen a squid before.”

Ms. Leatherwood is always looking for fun hands-on activities to get the students engaged in their learning.

“Hands-on lessons are usually something that they never forget,” said Ms. Leatherwood. “Anytime I can teach multiple learning styles it makes the experience for the students much more meaningful.”

Plenty of students in the class enjoyed touching, feeling, and seeing the different organs inside a squid.

“I thought it would be really disgusting, but cool at the same time,” said third-grader Miles Lewkowicz. “It’s been a lot of fun looking at the tentacles, beek, and eyes.”

Ms. Leatherwood said the class had been excited for this assignment for a few weeks. You could see the excitement of the curious minds as they explored a new creature.

“They were a little grossed out at the beginning, but as soon as the lesson started that quickly changed,” said Ms. Leatherwood. “The students were engaged and excited to have something different.”

Ms. Leatherwood said she is already looking into other unique, hands-on science lessons to bring to her students.

“We have a plant unit coming up,” said Ms. Leatherwood. “It would be a different kind of dissection. I think that will be a great comparison to the squid dissection.”